Psalm 6

There are some great comments that have been posted, so don’t miss out on the discussion. Go back and take a look at what others are seeing in the pages of Scripture.

Overview

Again we find that the Psalmist/David is struggling. He is torn apart emotionally, but knows that God has heard his crying and weeping. He knows that God will bring righteous judgment on his enemies. (An aside here, I have not been writing David because I do not have a commentary with much information about what was happening with David during these. Some of you may have that information or be interested in knowing what David may have been referring to directly in his Psalms. I wanted to read through them focusing on what Jesus has to do with the Psalms, so I am only using this commentary. But that is a good part of it being a public study, that many of you can comment with more information on how these relate to the life of David. Much of David’s life is recapitulated in Jesus.)

Characters

David, the Lord, my soul, those in Sheol, my foes and enemies, workers of evil

Key Verse

Verse 8 “Depart from me, all you workers of evil, for the Lord has heard the sound of my weeping.”

Cross Reference

Psalm 119:115 “Depart from me, you evildoers, that I may keep the commandments of my God.”

Psalm 139:19 “Oh that you would slay the wicked, O God! O men of blood, depart from me!”

Matthew 7:23 “And then will I declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you workers of lawlessness.'”

Matthew 25:41 “”Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels.”

Luke 13:27 “But he will say, ‘I tell you, I do not know where you come from. Depart from me, all you workers of evil!'”

Psalm 94:4 “They pour out their arrogant words; all the evildoers boast.”

Psalm 3:4 “I cried aloud to the Lord, and he answered me from his holy hill. Selah

Conclusion

    The most important thing is to know the Lord. Once I have a relationship with Him, I have nothing to fear. God will provide for me. Those who deny Him and turn from Him, will be judged.

I pray that all of my actions would provide a light to those who are my foes and enemies so that they can join the family of God and learn to know God and walk in His truth and righteousness. I pray also that I will continue in His righteousness so that I am never considered an enemy to anyone else.

Jesus in the Psalm

    At the beginning of the Psalm, David doesn’t know whether his suffering is coming from God or his enemies. However, he does not plead innocence, he seeks God’s grace. We know from Scripture that “God’s essential nature is to be merciful.”*

Exodus 34:6-7 “The Lord passed before him and proclaimed, “The Lord, the Lord, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, keeping steadfast love for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, but who will by no means clear the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children and the children’s children, to the third and fourth generation.”

Romans 9:15 “For he says to Moses, “I will have mercy on whom I have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I have compassion.” So then it depends not on human will or exertion, but on God, who has mercy.”

“When it resembles the Messiah’s suffering and enhances faith, suffering can actually prove that a person belongs to God.”*

1 Peter 1:6-12 “In this you rejoice, though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been grieved by various trials, so that the tested genuineness of your faith—more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire—may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ. Though you have not seen him, you love him. Though you do not now see him, you believe in him and rejoice with joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory, obtaining the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls. Concerning this salvation, the prophets who prophesied about the grace that was to be yours searched and inquired carefully, inquiring what person or time the Spirit of Christ in them was indicating when he predicted the sufferings of Christ and the subsequent glories. It was revealed to them that they were serving not themselves but you, in the things that have now been announced to you through those who preached the good news to you by the Holy Spirit sent from heaven, things into which angels long to look.” (P.S. I love this book, 1 Peter, read it sometime it is a great encouragement to my heart and soul.)

The struggles and grief David is going through in these Psalms draws him closer to God instead of sending him away from God. Paul calls this “godly grief”:

2 Corinthians 7:10 “For godly grief produces repentance that leads to salvation without regret, whereas worldly grief produces death.”

“David thus provides the follower of Christ an inspired vocabulary to express his or her frustration with God’s painful providence. David also leaves a legacy of faith by demonstrating that, when we flee to God alone for mercy, our conscience finds lasting relief from the trouble of our sins.”*

Hebrews 10:12-14 “But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God, waiting from that time until his enemies should be made a footstool for his feet. For by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are being sanctified.”

The conclusion of the commentary for this Psalm is, “We lean ultimately on God’s “steadfast love” (Ps. 6:4)—love that is fulfilled in Jesus Christ.”*

*Note: I am using the ESV Gospel Transformation Bible for the Jesus in the Psalm section, so these are paraphrases of the commentary with my own ideas sprinkled in.

Thank you for reading. I am excited to hear your key verses, observations, and thoughts! Please leave a comment to share them with us.

Tomorrow: Psalm 7

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