Psalm 5 (Includes Next Week’s Reading Plan)

Reading Plan for June 30—July 5

June 30        Psalm 6

July 1        Psalm 7

July 2        Psalm 8

July 3        Romans 2

July 4        Psalm 9

July 5        Psalm 10

Overview

Yesterday the Psalm was an evening psalm, and today seem to be in the morning. Once again he is asking for God to defend him and be his shield among evil men who speak worthless and damaging things. The Psalm talks about God’s power to handle all those against him. In His love we can seek refuge in Him. A few of the motifs from our previous readings again are seen here: shield, blessed, a God who hears his people and fills them with joy.

Characters

The Psalmist, Lord, boastful, evildoers, those who speak lies, the bloodthirsty and deceitful man, my enemies, all who take refuge in God, those who love His name, the righteous.

Key Verse

Verse 7 “But I, through the abundance of your steadfast love, will enter your house. I will bow down toward your holy temple in the fear of you.”

Verse 8 “Lead me, O Lord, in your righteousness because of my enemies; make your way straight before me.”

These two verses both share the importance of God’s role in our righteousness. We are not righteous without God, and we cannot enter His Presence without His forgiveness.

Cross References

Psalm 132:7 “Let us go to his dwelling place; let us worship at his footstool!”

1 Kings 8:29,30 “that your eyes may be open night and day toward this house, the place of which you have said, ‘My name shall be there,’ that you may listen to the prayer that your servant offers toward this place. And listen to the plea of your servant and of your people Israel, when they pray toward this place. And listen in heaven your dwelling place, and when you hear, forgive.” P.S. this verse is in the midst of pretty powerful verses. I recommend you read the whole section.

Psalm 11:4 “The Lord is in his holy temple; the Lord’s throne is in heaven; his eyes see, his eyelids test the children of man.”

Psalm 79:1 “O God, the nations have come into your inheritance; they have defiled your holy temple; they have laid Jerusalem in ruins.”

Psalm 23:3 “He restores my soul. He leads me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.”

Psalm 25:4, 5 “Make me to know your ways, O Lord; teach me your paths. Lead me in your truth and teach me, for you are the God of my salvation; for you I wait all the day long.”

Ezra 8:21 “Then I proclaimed a fast there, at the river Ahava, that we might humble ourselves before God, to seek from him a safe journey for ourselves, our children, and all our goods.”

Conclusion

    God is not contained by a building any longer, and if you read the section in 1 Kings you also read about God never truly being contained in the temple. The fascinating observation I had was in verse 4 when he is saying no evil can dwell with God, yet in God’s love he lets the psalmist into His temple. Once again we must rely fully on God’s righteousness. God is the righteousness that we need. God is the only one who can protect us because all there is to fear is His judgment. Man can do nothing to us, and if we are not with God it is still He who we should fear. I am so glad I used both verses as key verses today, because the Ezra verse is really beautiful. As my family is on this journey, we have found it so obvious that we are only here by God’s provision and sustenance, and we must remain humble before him as we continue, seeking His guidance with Davy and all our resources.

Jesus in the Psalm

    David relied on God for his righteousness, as we also must do to receive God’s favor. Jesus is our shield. His death and resurrection gives all of us the opportunity to come near to God with joy, confidence, and assurance of His protection. Romans 8:33-34 says, “Who shall bring any charge against God’s elect? It is God who justifies. Who is to condemn? Christ Jesus is the one who died—more than that, who was raised—who is at the right hand of God, who indeed is interceding for us.” Once again this is just a sampling of a great section in Scripture. Soon we will get to this chapter in Romans, but go read ahead now and let this section bathe your own heart in confidence.

Today’s Application: Read the surrounding sections of the cross references today and any day to find God’s truth, and Jesus’ presence throughout Scripture and for you.

*Note: I am using the ESV Gospel Transformation Bible for the Jesus in the Psalm section, so these are paraphrases of the commentary with my own ideas sprinkled in.

I am excited to hear your key verses, observations, and thoughts! Please leave a comment to share them with us.

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2 thoughts on “Psalm 5 (Includes Next Week’s Reading Plan)

  1. Hi Annie! I did this before reading what you wrote, so it looks like I’ve repeated a lot of what you said. I feel a little rusty with this Bible study method (and Bible study in general), so forgive the lack of depth in thoughts. I’m praying I can go deeper as my Bible study “muscles” get back into shape.

    Overview

    The Psalmist (David) prays to God to save him from his enemies. He contrasts the righteous and the wicked, and appeals to God’s sense of righteousness as a reason that his enemies should be punished.

    Characters

    David, God, evildoers/unrighteous/enemies, the righteous

    Key Verse(s)

    “But I, through the abundance of your steadfast love, will enter your house. I will bow down toward your holy temple in the fear of you.” (v. 7)

    “For you bless the righteous, O LORD, you cover him with favor as with a shield.” (v. 12)

    Cross References

    Having trouble figuring out how to use these with my Bible…I’ll work on it!

    Conclusion

    One of the things I like best about the Psalms is that they encourage us to come to God with our needs; they encourage us to worship him; they encourage complete dependence on him, and that he is worthy of our trust. My study Bible (ESV Study Bible) says this is a lament psalm, and it is structured similarly to other lament psalms. One of the things that stood out to me was David’s appeal to God’s sense of righteousness in his request to be rescued from his enemies. My commentary said, “The argument of the psalm is that the success of these persecutors would contradict the biblical view of God’s commitment to righteousness.” This is encouraging to me because it proves that God will NOT let evil last forever, and the psalmist knows this.

    Jesus in the Passage

    Whenever I hear contrasts between the righteous and unrighteous in the OT, I am always struck with the idea that before Christ and without Him, I am among the unrighteous evildoers. That’s me. Jesus alone gives us right standing before God, and ultimately, it is only to His righteousness that we can appeal to when asking for God’s help. I think David understood this pre-New Covenant, but I think it’s something that Christians should think about often, that our righteousness is only through Christ, and “but for the grace of God, there go I.”

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